Prisco’s Family Market

1108 Prairie Street, Aurora, IL 60506 | 630-264-9400

Hours: Monday - Friday, 7 am to 8:30 pm | Saturday, 7 am to 8 pm | Sunday, 8 am to 7 pm

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Some Exciting New Items Coming to Prisco’s

As we head into fall this week, it’s time to start thinking about the heartier foods of autumn... And in light of the changing season, we have got some exciting new items being added to our grocery department that I feel are well worth sharing with you.

The first is a new line of pasta called Mrs. Miller’s Homemade Noodles. This family owned and operated noodle maker is located in the heart of Amish country in Fredericksburg, Ohio. Started by Esther (Mrs.) Miller and her husband Leon some 54 years ago, their business today is run by their children. Their noodles, Our Noodles, are made from the best ingredients:

  • Extra Fancy Durum Wheat Flour that has a high protein content and gives the noodles a nice, firm texture.

  • They continue to use farm fresh whole eggs rather than powdered eggs because they care about the quality and color of their noodles.

Mrs. Miller’s Noodles are carefully made:

  • Using the old-fashioned methods of kneading, rolling, cutting and drying - just like Grandma used to.

  • Cut thickly for a hearty taste.

  • Carefully dried to hold up well during cooking and to ensure food safety.

Finally, Mrs. Miller’s Noodles are healthy & all natural

  • Low Fat

  • A good source of good carbs

  • Low Glycemic Index

  • High Energy Food

  • Low Sodium

  • NON-GMO

  • NO Salt

  • NO Artificial colors

  • NO Preservatives

Another category that I’d like all of our customers to learn about is bone broth. If you are like me, this is something you have likely never heard of but now is a good time to learn. Let me begin by explaining the difference between broth, stock and bone broth.

All three are built on the same basic foundation: water, meat or bones, vegetables and seasonings.

Broth is typically made with meat and can contain a small amount of bones (think of the bones in a fresh whole chicken). Broth is typically simmered for a short period of time (45 minutes to 2 hours). It is very light in flavor, thin in texture and rich in protein.

Stock is typically made with bones and can contain a small amount of meat (think of the meat that adheres to a beef neck bone). Often the bones are roasted before simmering them as this simple technique greatly improves the flavor. Beef stocks, for example, can present a faint acrid flavor if the bones aren’t first roasted. Stock is typically simmered for a moderate amount of time (3 to 4 hours). Stock is a good source of gelatin.

Bone Broth is typically made with bones and can contain a small amount of meat adhering to the bones. As with stock, bones are typically roasted first to improve the flavor of the bone broth. Bone broths are typically simmered for a very long period of time (often for 8 hours, and sometimes in excess of 24 hours), with the purpose being not only to produce gelatin from collagen-rich joints but also to release a small amount of trace minerals from bones. At the end of cooking, the bones should crumble when pressed lightly between your thumb and forefinger.

I’ve heard that bone broth can have great health advantages, but I’m no nutritionist so I did a bit of Googling on the subject. Bone broths are extraordinarily rich in protein, and can be a source of minerals as well. Glycine supports the body's detoxification process and is used in the synthesis of hemoglobin, bile salts and other naturally-occurring chemicals within the body. Glycine also supports digestion and the secretion of gastric acids. Proline, especially when paired with vitamin C, supports good skin health.

Homemade broth is rich in calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and other trace minerals. The minerals in broth are easily absorbed by the body. Bone broth even contains glucosamine and chondroiton – which are thought to help mitigate the deletorious effects of arthritis and joint pain. Rather than shelling out big bucks for glucosamine-chondroitin and mineral supplements, just make bone broth and other nutritive foods a part of your regular diet.

Further, homemade bone broths are often rich in gelatin. Gelatin is an inexpensive source of supplementary protein. Gelatin also shows promise in the fight against degenerative joint disease. It helps to support the connective tissue in your body and also helps the fingernails and hair to grow well and strong.

To start, we now carry Pacific brand Organic Bone Broth – Chicken. If that is as popular as we believe, more varieties will be added. Please give these new items a try and tell us what you think.

 

Thanks, and I'll see you in the soup aisle.

Dave