Prisco’s Family Market

1108 Prairie Street, Aurora, IL 60506 | 630-264-9400

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Guinness Trivia for St. Patrick’s Day- Tuesday, March 13, 2018

When friends or neighbors meet on the street anywhere in Ireland, the second thing said after "Hello!" is, “Are you goin' fer one?”

“Goin'” refers to the local pub and “fer one” refers to a freshly poured pint of Guinness.

  • Pouring a glass or pint of Guinness is a skill. A “perfect pour” should take 199.50 seconds. This is the result of pouring at an angle of 45 degrees followed by a rest. This is crucial. Most Irish people would cringe if they saw anyone pour it any other way. After a pause, long enough so what’s in the glass is a perfect black, the rest of the glass is filled, again at a 45-degree angle. What is handed across the bar should have a creamy head and should be served at exactly 42.8F.
  • What’s the ball doing in the cans? The little white balls that clink around aluminum cans of Guinness are called “widgets” (patented by Guinness in 1969), and are filled with nitrogen-infused beer like you’d find on tap. When you pull the ring on your can, the change in pressure causes that nitrogenated beer to bubble out into the rest of the brew, creating a foamy head like you’d find on draught.
  • The Guinness Book of World Records was made to settle a pub argument. One November day in 1951, Sir Hugh Beaver, former Guinness managing director, was out shooting with some friends when they began to argue over which was the fastest game bird in Europe. When reference books supplied no answer, Beaver decided that the drinking world desperately needed one volume that could single-handedly settle any pub dispute. Three years later, The Guinness Book of Records printed its first thousand copies. It has since been published in 23 languages, in 100 countries.
  • What color is Guinness really? At first glance Guinness is quite dark in color, almost black, but actually, it’s red. Hold your glass up to the light and you’ll see a deep ruby red. The company attributes this in part to the roasting of malted barley during preparation.
  • Guinness was first marketed as a health elixir. The first-ever national print advertisement for Guinness touts the stout as a “valuable restorative after Influenza and other illnesses,” and invokes doctors who commend the beer’s ability to enrich blood and cure insomnia.
  • According to a study conducted at Northumbria University in 2013, approximately 13 million pints of Guinness were expected to be drunk on St. Patrick's Day. On an average day, about 5.5 million pints of Guinness are consumed.